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Art of Stone Landscaping Company

Leaves of Three

Leaves of Three

in Pests and Poisons | 0 comments

Poison Ivy If you spend any time at all outside this summer, you’ll likely come across poison ivy (rhus radicans). The chemicals in poison ivy can cause redness, rashes, itching, and blistering. For some people, symptoms can be mild. Others may have a much stronger reaction. All parts of the plant are toxic all year round. Touch poison ivy—or come in contact with animals, clothes, or equipment that have touched the plant—and oils can transfer to your skin. Poison...

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Do You Have Ants in Your Plants?

in Pests and Poisons | 2 comments

Fire ants are on the march again. Here are some strategies to stop them in their tracks: Get them in hot water. Pouring about 3 gallons of very hot (almost boiling) water can kill an ant mound. When handling such large quantity of hot water, take precautions against burning yourself or surrounding plants. This may not totally eradicate the mound, but it’s so low-tech and low-cost that you might as well start here. Lay off the gas (and bleach...

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This is Not Poison Ivy

This is Not Poison Ivy

in Pests and Poisons | 0 comments

Every summer, the poison ivy seems to explode and so do the myths surrounding this plant. One of the most common is to incorrectly identify Virginia Creeper as poison ivy. It is often found in the same places but it looks totally different (five leaflets): (The other vine behind it is English Ivy.)   and this is Poison Ivy (three leaflets): And side-by-side: The plant with the biggest leaves in this picture is Poison Ivy. This is a very...

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Gardening Lingo Helps You Avoid Invasive Plants

Gardening Lingo Helps You Avoid Invasive Plants

in Gardening Tips, Pests and Poisons | 0 comments

You’ve probably heard that native plants are better for your garden than non-native, invasive plants. But what’s the difference? And why are invasives a problem? Knowing some common horticulture terms can help you make the right choice for your garden. To help you pick the best plants for a healthy, thriving landscape, we’ve defined some common terms below. Common landscaping terms: Native: a plant that has been growing in a region for a long time and has adapted to...

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So Long, Mosquitos

So Long, Mosquitos

in Gardening Tips, Pests and Poisons | 0 comments

Mosquito larvae hatch in pools of water, so the first line of defense against these unwanted pests is to remove standing water from your property. Check the following areas often, especially if you have had significant rainfall: • Saucers under potted plants • Children’s toys • Buckets, wheelbarrows or lawn tools • Tarps or plastic sheets covering pools, compost piles, etc. • Patio furniture and grills • Lawn decorations • Pet bowls • Trash Cans You should also keep...

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Got Deer? Make Your Garden Deer Resistant

Got Deer? Make Your Garden Deer Resistant

in Garden Design, Perennials, Pests and Poisons | 0 comments

Got deer? Make Your Garden Deer Resistant With Strong-Smelling Plants We get asked about deer-resistant gardening all the time. Deer are everywhere, and they’ll eat anything—including your prized azaleas and hosta! They eat tree leaves, too, up to almost six feet off the ground. Male deer damage trees by rubbing them with their antlers. Spring is prime time for deer to “browse” the landscape in search of food. Does and their fawns need extra nutrition, which they just might...

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Earth Friendly Pest Management for Your Landscape

Earth Friendly Pest Management for Your Landscape

in Organic Gardening, Pests and Poisons | 0 comments

Pests in your landscape are pesky. But routinely applying insecticides isn’t great for the earth and can kill good bugs, too. Try managing pests with the earth-friendlier approach known as IPM (integrated pest management). IPM offers tools to manage bugs, with insecticides used only as a last resort. This cool website shows IPM in action against Japanese beetles. The first tool is knowledge: know that Japanese beetles don’t stay long, just 4-6 weeks, and typically chew only the margins...

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Landscaping and masonry contractors. Art of Stone Gardening is a full service design, masonry, hardscape and landscaping company. We plan, design, and install residential gardens and landscapes in North Georgia. Our local service area: Clermont, Cleveland, Cumming, Dawsonville, Dahlonega, Gainesville,
Helen, Murrayville, Sautee Nacoochee, Oakwood, Suches GA.
770-519-6372

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