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Art of Stone Landscaping Company

North Georgia Gardening Tips

Build a Freestanding Garden Wall

by in Jason the Mason, Recent Projects, Stonework/Construction

Build a Freestanding Garden Wall

Great landscaping idea: build a freestanding garden wall Building a freestanding stone garden wall will add timeless beauty to your landscape. In this post, we’ll show you step-by-step how our team built a gorgeous, mortared freestanding wall. As their name suggests, freestanding walls stand alone. Nothing supports them from behind, so they need to be very strong. Freestanding walls have to withstand pressures from above (the weight of the stones), changes underneath (freeze and...

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Class – Create A Spring Herb Container Garden

by in Perennials

Class – Create A Spring Herb Container Garden

  Suzanne Brosche of Art of Stone Gardening will be teaching a class on container gardening with herbs at University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA. Herb container gardens are a great idea for a small space landscape, balcony garden or for cooks. Date: April 22, 2017 Meets: Saturday from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM Hours: 3 Location: University of North Georgia Continuing Ed 101 25 Schultz Ave. Dahlonega, GA 30533 Instructor: Suzanne Brosche of...

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Colorful Perennials for Shade

by in Perennials

Colorful Perennials for Shade

Shade gardens can be considered a problem area of a yard because often it is difficult for plants to be visible in darker areas. If you plan well and use plants with brightly colored leaves you can add  ‘pop’ even in a dark spot. Use plants with showy foliage in light colors to achieve both color and texture in a perennial border throughout the summer months. A few suggestions for shade loving plants with...

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Reblooming Daylilies for Vibrant Summer Color

by in Perennials

Reblooming Daylilies for Vibrant Summer Color

Daylilies are a classic plant for southern gardens. Not only do they produce large, spectacular flowers, they can withstand our heat and tolerate periods of drought. Previously a daylily would bloom for a short period in early to mid summer, then leave behind declining foliage. Later the Stella D’oro daylily was introduced which gave gardener’s a repeat blooming flower. Today your color choices go beyond the yellow of the original Stella D’oro. You can...

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A Warm Welcome for Worms

by in Gardening Tips, Organic Gardening

A Warm Welcome for Worms

Most people know that earthworms are a component of healthy soil. As they work their way through the dirt, worms aerate the soil and increase the soil’s ability to hold nutrients. The castings excreted by earthworms are an excellent fertilizer. Worms can also make soil more hospitable to plants by helping sandy soil to retain water or by improving the drainage of heavy clay soil. Gardeners who use raised beds or containers can also...

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Don’t Drain it, Chain it

by in Stonework/Construction

Don’t Drain it, Chain it

Rain chains are a tool that can help clean the environment and beautify your home. Standard gutters and downspouts direct water away from your house. However, all of that rushing rain flowing off of roofs and other hard surfaces contributes to erosion, storm-drain overflows, water pollution, and flooding. Homeowners can take steps to reduce their own rainfall runoff by slowing down the rain that flows off their roofs. Rain chains, which have been used...

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Mulching ABCs

by in Seasonal To-Dos

Mulching ABCs

Mulching promotes plant health. Mulching helps plants conserve moisture and withstand temperature extremes. It also keeps down weeds. Here is how to mulch. Apply three inches of mulch. If you use less than that, the mulch is ineffective. More than five inches can prevent oxygen from reaching your plants’ roots. Keep the mulch two to three inches away from the trunks of established plants. Mulch that touches trunks may encourage them to decay and...

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Plan to Prune

by in Pruning, Trees

Plan to Prune

When early spring arrives, one of the first landscape tasks will be pruning some of your plants. Pruning ornamentals really means “thinning” them: selectively cutting back individual limbs to a side branch or main trunk. What you probably don’t want to do is to “hedge” your plant, or cut all branches to the same length. This discourages full growth and creates plants that look like poodle tails. Thinning is good maintenance. It stimulates new...

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Shape your Crape the Right Way

by in Pruning, Trees

Shape your Crape the Right Way

Crape myrtle adds beauty to landscapes. It is hardy, drought resistant, and relatively disease free. Such a marvelous ornamental deserves our care and respect. So please, whatever you do, don’t “murder” your crape. That’s actually what landscapers jokingly call it when people cut back a crape myrtle’s large limbs and leave only stumps. What happens then is that a whole bunch of new growth will come out near the cut, which will make the...

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Japanese Maple Magic

by in Pruning, Trees

Japanese Maple Magic

A well-pruned Japanese Maple is a marvel, perhaps at its best in autumn, with blazing leaves set against a backdrop of black, twisting branches. Japanese Maples also add striking beauty to winter landscapes, when their bold branching is most visible. You will have to prune to show this maple at its best. Here is a well-pruned Japanese Maple. Notice the light shining through its branching structure. * Without proper tending, Japanese Maples get “hairy.”...

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Art of Stone Gardening is a full-service design, masonry, hardscape and landscape company. We plan, design, and install residential gardens and landscapes in North Georgia.
770-519-6372

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